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A Toast to Menstruation

Ah, all those adolescent years of whining in celibacy when the female curse would arrive every month to inconvenience my clothing, my comfort, my life.

With my life the way it is now, as a young married lady I'd like to raise my glass and say:

"Thank you God for the sign of another baby-free month."

Cheers.

Comments

trey said…
AMEN.

My friend tells me that for the promiscuous, getting your period is like Christmas morning.

Or in your case, married folk :P

Glad you're back in the blogging circle!!

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